Aims & Scope

International Journal of Earth Science and Geophysics is an Open Access, peer reviewed, academic Journal promoting the various interdisciplinary aspects of geosciences.

The Journal focuses upon publishing various aspects under the scope of Physical Geography, Geomorphology, Soil Study, Hydrology, Meteorology, Climatology, Biogeography, Geology, Mineralogy and Petrology, Geochemistry, Paleontology, Stratigraphy, Structural Geology, Geology Engineering, Sedimentology, Geophysics and Geodesy, Seismic Activity, Crustal Geology, Edaphology and Pedology, Ecology, Oceanography and Limnology, Glaciology, Atmospheric Sciences, Atmospheric Chemistry, Atmospheric Physics, Gravity, Heat Flow, Vibrations, Electricity, Electromagnetic Waves, Magnetism, Radioactivity, Fluid Dynamics, Mineral Physics, Regions of the Earth, Size and form of the Earth, Structure of the Interior, Magnetosphere, Space Probes, etc.

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The Journal considers various articles such as Original Article, Reviews, Mini Reviews, Commentaries, etc., for possible publication. We focus upon bringing the new thoughts a perfect platform to share, learn and contribute. The Journal is dedicated to provide high scientific quality articles, high visibility, broad readership, rigorous peer review, rapid publication and standard production and copyediting. Please contact us with any questions or comments you may have. Send E-mail

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International Journal of Earth Science and Geophysics

Editorial board


NAME TITLE UNIVERSITY BIOGRAPHY

Constantinos A. Georgiou

Professor


Agricultural University of Athens
Greece

Dr. Constantinos A. Georgiou is a Professor in Agricultural University of Athens at Greece. He received his B.Sc. in Chemistry from University of Athens, Greece in 1984 and his PhD in Analytical Chemistry in 1990. During 1991-1995 he was Biochemist in Chief at AgiaEleni Hospital. view full biography...

Dr. Constantinos A. Georgiou is a Professor in Agricultural University of Athens at Greece. He received his B.Sc. in Chemistry from University of Athens, Greece in 1984 and his PhD in Analytical Chemistry in 1990. During 1991-1995 he was Biochemist in Chief at AgiaEleni Hospital. In 1995 he joined Agricultural University of Athens. His research involves food authentication through rare earth elements fingerprinting& synchronous fluorescence, high throughput oil & food quality assessment, whole cell biosensors, possess analytical chemistry, oxidative and environmental stress by heavy metals. Support comes from national and EU funds. Dr. Constantinos is currently editing "FOOD AUTHENTICATION: Analysis, Regulation & Consumers" for Willey Blackwell.

Valeria Paoletti

Researcher


University of Naples Federico II
Italy

Valeria Paoletti received a PhD in Geophysics and Volcanology from the University Federico II of Naples in 2000. She is presently Researcher in Applied Geophysics at the same University. Her research field is mainly in potential field methods and interpretation, including processing, analysis and inversion. She is member of SEG and of the Editorial Board of the Scientific World Journal.

Saurabh Kumar Verma

Mentor and advisor in Aquifer Mapping Program


National Geophysical Research Institute
India

Dr. Saurabh K. Verma is a Mentor and advisor in Aquifer Mapping Program at NGRI, Hyderabad and also Adjunct Professor in Hydrogeophysics Group at Aarhus University, Aarhus. He was Director Grade Scientist in NGRI during 1998-2006. He worked as Deputy Director in NGRI during 1992-1998. view full biography...

Dr. Saurabh K. Verma is a Mentor and advisor in Aquifer Mapping Program at NGRI, Hyderabad and also Adjunct Professor in Hydrogeophysics Group at Aarhus University, Aarhus. He was Director Grade Scientist in NGRI during 1998-2006. He worked as Deputy Director in NGRI during 1992-1998. Dr. Verma has been Visiting Professor/Scientist in Australia, Finland, Canada and Japan; and Visiting NSF Fellow to the USA. He has been involved with 3D EM modelling and joint inversion of geophysical data like: MT and seismic, electrical and EM, etc. He has applied these methods extensively in the field to address a variety of geological problems ranging from kimberlite exploration to HVDC Power Transmission. He also headed 'Geophysical Investigations in Antarctica' programme at NGRI for several years and carried out EM, radiometric and ground and helicopter-borne magnetic investigations in Antarctica and GPR surveys in Svalbard, Norway. Dr. Verma's primary interest lies in electromagnetic and electrical exploration - particularly in 'Time domain EM Methods'. He was a Raja Ramanna Fellow at NGRI.

International Journal of Earth Science and Geophysics Reviewer Board

Reviewer Board

NAME

UNIVERSITY

COUNTRY

Dr. Ingrid Tomac itomac@eng.ucsd.edu University of California USA 2
Dr. Timothy P Sullivan
The University of Tennessee Health Science Center
USA
Dr. Emilio Custodio
Technical University of Catalonia
Spain
Dr. Vincenzo Allocca
University of Naples "Federico II"
Italy
Dr. Husam Baalousha
Aachen University of Technology
Germany
Dr. Dmitry Sokoloff
Moscow State University
Russia
Dr. Takashi Nakagawa
Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology
Japan
Dr. Bruno Castelle
Université de Bordeaux
France
Dr. Charlie Paxton
University of South Florida
USA
Dr. Nelson Guillermo Rangel Buitrago
Universidad del Atlántico
Colombia
Dr. Klaus Meyer-Arendt
University of West Florida
USA
Dr. Musa Aliyu
University of Greenwich
UK
Dr. Ingrid Tomac
University of California
USA
Dr. Haslinger Edith
Austrian Institute of Technology
Austria
Dr. Haslinger Edith
Austrian Institute of Technology
Austria
Dr. Nils R Backeberg
University College London
London
Dr. Nils R Backeberg
University College London
London
Dr. Emmanue lnjonfang
Lordlane University
Californi
Dr. Ettore Valente
Università del Molise
Italy
Dr. Henry Bokuniewicz
Yale University
USA
Dr. Stephen M Smith
University of Miami
USA
Dr. Xiaochi Zhou
Duke University
USA
Dr. Benjamin Sautter
Universiti Teknologi Petronas
Malaysia
Dr. Mario Rodriguez
Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México
Mexico
Dr. Thana Yeeram
Mahasarakham University
Thailand
Dr. Till Haegele
Suranaree University of TechnolSuranaree University of Technology
Thailand
Dr. Zhi Yunjiang
South China Normal University
China
Dr. Yi Wang
China University of Geosciences
China
Dr. Ming xiao XIE
Tianjin University
China
Dr. Zhenxia Zhang
China Earthquake Administration
China
Dr. Zhou Zhang
Purdue University
USA
Dr. Guodong Cui
China University of Petroleum
China
Dr. Zhiqiang Li
Guangdong Ocean University
China
Dr. Wei Chen
Tongji University
China
Dr. Fernando Putti
UNESP - Sao Paulo State University
Brazil
Dr. Théophile Njanko
Université de Dschang
Cameroon
Dr. IJ Basson
University of Natal
South Africa
Dr. R D H Bugan
Stellenbosch University
South Africa
Dr. Akala Andrew
University of Lagos
Nigeria
Dr. Olayinka Olawepo
University of Ilorin
Nigeria
Dr. Wael Haggag
Behna university
Egypt
Dr. Ahmed Hamza Hussieny Ali
Assiut University
Egypt
Dr. Elijah Liflyand
Bar-Ilan University
Israel
Dr. Baylie Damtie
President of Bahir dar University
Ethiopia
Dr. Fasil Tesema
Bahir Dar University
Ethiopia
Dr. Fabrizio Antonioli
ENEA National Agency for New Technologies, Energy and Environment
Italy
Dr. Tsegaye Kassa
Bahir Dar University
Ethiopia
Dr. Antonio Pulido Bosch
University of Almeria
Spain
Dr. Akinori Takahashi
Waseda University
Japan
Dr. Md. Surabuddin Mondal
Bulent Ecevit University
Turkey
Dr. Amin Nawahda
Sohar University
Oman
Dr. Ioan Sebastian Jucu
West University of Timisoara
Romania

Articles

Stephen B Leatherman and Stephen P Leatherman

A number of techniques have been employed to measure rip currents, but the most accurate ones generally require sophisticated equipment and a boat to retrieve GPS-controlled drifters. A new, simple and inexpensive method involves using a laser rangefinder at the beach to determine rip current speed.

Published Date: September 04, 2017 | Int J Earth Sci Geophys, IJESG-3-014, (Volume 3, Issue 1), Research Article

M Abusaada and Sauter

In arid and semi-arid areas, quantifying groundwater recharge is an essential issue for groundwater resources management. Since recharge is a function of many parameters such as level of karst development and climatic conditions, then selecting the best technique of recharge estimation that takes these parameters into consideration is still an issue.

Published Date: September 02, 2017 | Int J Earth Sci Geophys, IJESG-3-013, (Volume 3, Issue 1), Research Article

Michael D Fuller

VGP (Virtual Geomagnetic Pole) paths during reversals are preferentially located in roughly north south circum-Pacific arcs, where the temperature of the mantle at the core mantle boundary is lowest. This indicates that the movement of magnetic flux concentrations in the outermost core responds to thermal constraints during the reversal.

Published Date: September 02, 2017 | Int J Earth Sci Geophys, IJESG-3-012, (Volume 3, Issue 1), Research Article

Dogan Kalafat

The Black Sea, a complex basin between the Arabian, Anatolian and Eurasian plates, is a feature of special interest for understanding the geologic history of the region. It was formed as a "back-arc" basin over the subduction zone during the closing of the Tethys Ocean.

Published Date: June 26, 2017 | Int J Earth Sci Geophys, IJESG-3-011, (Volume 3, Issue 1), Research Article

Ayodele OS, Awokunmi EE and Oshin OO

The distribution and accumulation of heavy metals in the stream sediments of Okemesi-Ijero area, southwestern Nigeria was examined. Stream sediment samples from tensites were characterized for metals content such as Cadmium (Cd), Lead (Pb), Copper (Cu), Nickel (Ni), Iron (Fe), Manganese (Mn) and Zinc (Zn).

Published Date: June 17, 2017 | Int J Earth Sci Geophys, IJESG-3-010, (Volume 3, Issue 1), Review Article

Marco Romano Jorg Frobisch

In this text we briefly explore whether ridiculing material objects like a 'Cadillac engine', a 'desk', 'gold bars in a vault' as reduction ad absurdum in 'dialectical duels' or as a metaphor for teaching evolution is really phylogenetically justified, or whether that evidence really needs an explanation in the evolutionary field.

Published Date: September 29, 2016 | Int J Earth Sci Geophys, IJESG-2-009, (Volume 2, Issue 1), Review Article

Patrick J Barosh

Recent independent geologic compilations of southeastern New England and the Anti-Atlas of Morocco show near identical sequences of Late Proterozoic through Ordovician lithology and events that indicate a very close connection until separated in the Mesozoic.

Published Date: August 09, 2016 | Int J Earth Sci Geophys, IJESG-2-008, (Volume 2, Issue 1), Research Article

Tobias Ullmann, Christian Büdel, Roland Baumhauer and Majid Padashi

The Sentinel-1 Satellite (S-1) of ESA's Copernicus Mission delivers freely available C-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data that are suited for interferometric applications (InSAR). The high geometric resolution of less than fifteen meter.

Published Date: July 18, 2016 | Int J Earth Sci Geophys, IJESG-2-007, (Volume 2, Issue 1), Research Article

Shigekazu Kusumoto and Toshiyasu Nagao

We show a fundamental equation that yields a caldera morphology caused by a single magma chamber in an anisotropic homogeneous regional stress field, where the ratio between the maximum and minimum horizontal principal stresses is constant.

Published Date: February 20, 2016 | Int J Earth Sci Geophys, IJESG-2-006, (Volume 2, Issue 1), Review Article

Duke Brantley, Mike Waddell, John Shafer and Venkat Lakshmi

This paper reviews the effects of faulting on the numerical simulation of CO2 injection into the South Georgia Rift (SGR) basin. The focus of this research is to use a 3-D geologic model that includes structure and faulting to better analyze the impact of these features on the ultimate fate of injected CO2.

Published Date: January 22, 2016 | Int J Earth Sci Geophys, IJESG-2-005, (Volume 2, Issue 1), Research Article

David Blank

The phenomenon of global warming taking place today is widely believed to be a consequence of increased anthropogenic CO2 rising in the atmosphere. In reality, the greenhouse gas effect is more complex and has many uncertainties that still don't allow us to create a verisimilar scenario of future changes. Glacier melting is a fact, but commonly presented assessments of current melting intensity is obviously over-estimated due to the use of selective data.

Published Date: December 30, 2015 | Int J Earth Sci Geophys, IJESG-1-004, (Volume 1, Issue 1), Review Article

Mike Fuller and Ian Williams

Few reversal records have been obtained from intrusions, although the possibility of a near constant sampling rate by thermal remanent magnetization (TRM) makes them potentially valuable for paleosecular variation (PSV) and reversal records. In the reversal record from the Tatoosh intrusion, in Mt. Rainier National Park, the field intensity decreases by one order of magnitude and is near to its minimum before major transitional directional changes are seen.

Published Date: November 30, 2015 | Int J Earth Sci Geophys, IJESG-1-003, (Volume 1, Issue 1), Review Article

Andrei V Vorobev and Gulnara R Shakirova

The paper deals with research, modelling and analysis of internal geomagnetic field parameters, which considered as the geomagnetic field induced by internal (intraterrestrial) sources. The calculation was based on the set of final coefficients for World Magnetic Model for Epoch 2010/2015 and Epoch 2015/2020.

Published Date: November 30, 2015 | Int J Earth Sci Geophys, IJESG-1-002, (Volume 1, Issue 1), Research Article

Elizabeth A. Yankovsky, Darrell A. Terry and Camelia C. Knapp

In this study, we analyze newly acquired seismic and gravity data sets (MGL1111) from the central Aleutian Basin of the Bering Sea to substantiate the hypothesis first proposed by Scholl and Cooper (1978) that methane plumes and associated gas hydrates are responsible for the regional seismic anomalies.

Published Date: September 07, 2015 | Int J Earth Sci Geophys, IJESG-1-001, (Volume 1, Issue 1), Research Article

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